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Value-Based Benefit Design Case Studies


PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS REFERENCE DATABASE IS OUTDATED AND DOES NOT REFLECT INFORMATION GATHERED ON VALUE BASED PURCHASING IN 2015.

A wide range of employers and employer-based coalitions have been implementing value-based approaches to health care for quite some time. The good news is that many have gone before you in this endeavor, using a variety of benefit designs, tools and incentives to encourage healthy habits, curb costs, increase productivity and produce a healthier bottom line for the everyone.

The first value-based benefit design case study shows that pioneers like Pitney Bowes were looking at pragmatic solutions even before the term VBBD was coined.

In another case study, the Asheville Project proved that pharmacists play a pivotal role in chronic disease management and can dramatically improve health outcomes.

The Mid-America Coalition on Health Care spearheaded a collaboration of Kansas City-based stakeholders to improve the health and wellness of employees, their families and their community. 

Drummond Company did not let the constraints of multi-year union contracts keep them from exploring value-based approaches to improve the health of their workers, thereby alleviating health care costs when employees became retirees.

Polk County, Florida took the basic elements of The Asheville Project and applied them to its municipal employees who suffer from or are most at risk for developing some of the leading chronic diseases.


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 National Business Coalition on Health.
 All Rights Reserved. Disclaimer.


 
A system of coordinated health care interventions and communications for populations with long-term conditions in which patient self-care plays a significant role.
Value Based Benefit Design is the explicit use of plan incentives to encourage enrollee adoption of one or more of the following: 1) appropriate use of high value services, including certain prescription drugs and preventive services; 2) adoption of healthy lifestyles, such as smoking cessation or increased physical activity; 3) use of high performance providers who adhere to evidence-based treatment guidelines. Value-Based Benefit Design is distinguished from Value-Based Insurance Design in that it extends beyond the realm of insurance to include incentive-based programming such as wellness services.
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